Rage Inducing Puzzles #3

Welcome back to Rage Inducing Puzzles! Last week’s puzzles were worth a total of 60 RIP points. However, this week’s puzzles are winter specials! The risk is higher, but so is the reward! 150 whole RIP points are up for grabs this week. Let’s take a look on last week’s puzzles:

  1. 545+5=550. 6 pts.
  2. If 1=5, then 5=1. 5 pts.
  3. 706006 upside down is GOOGOL(10100). 01 upside down is 10. The answer is 1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000. 8 pts.
  4. Twelve has six letters. Six has three letters. Eight has five letters. 7 pts. (-2 if you said 4.)
  5. 1. The decimal expansion of 1/7 is .1428571428571… 1000000/7 has a remainder of 1, so the answer is the first digit of  1/7, which is 1. 10 pts.
  6. 4. 4/9=.444444444…  4 pts.
  7. 9. 1/11= .09090909090909090909… Since we want an even digit, the answer is 9. 5 pts.
  8. Put the marbles in 3 piles. Two have 1 marble and the third has 721,236,285,384,374,596,261 marbles. 2 pts.
  9. 24. The smallest number that’s greater than the previous number that has one more letter than the previous number. 7 pts.
  10. 34. Each number is the difference of the previous two. 6 pts.

In total, there are 110 RIP points attainable.

110 = That is…impressive.

95-109 = Amazing job!

80-94 = Great job!

65-79 = Good job.

50-64 = Nice try!

35-49 = Think outside the box!

20-34 = Maybe you’ll do better next time.

1-20 = Try harder!

1 = Well, at least you don’t have…

-2 = No comment.

And here are these week’s puzzles! Remember, these puzzles are meant to be hard, seemingly impossible, and you guessed it: rage inducing. Good luck!

  1. What are the last 6 digits of (1000 x 999 x 998 x… x 3 x 2 x 1)?
  2. Suppose you’re trapped in a room with 27 weights, a pulley, and a balance scale. One of the weights is slightly heavier than the others. You must put the correct weight on the pulley to unlock the door. You may not use the pulley before putting the heavier weight on it. Can you escape only using 3 weighings?
  3. Suppose you’re trapped in another room, this time with 10 sets of 10 poker chips, an electronic scale, and the pulley . All of the chips in one set weigh one gram more than the other chips, which weigh 5 grams each. All the rules that applied to the last room apply to this one. Can you escape, this time using only 1 weighing??
  4. I’m thinking of a word with 9 letters. If you take away 6 of them, you are left with one. What word am I thinking of?
  5. I’m thinking of a 2-digit number. I will give clues about it, but every other clue (the 2nd, 4th, 6th etc) will be a lie. Ready? It’s odd. It’s greater than 75. It’s less than 50. It’s not a prime number. It’s less than 40. It’s greater than 40. It’s greater than 30. The number is 37. What’s the number??
  6. If yesterday was Sunday, then two days after six days before yesterday was Thursday. If yesterday was not Sunday, then either today is Wednesday or today is eighteen days after six days before one day after thirteen days before the day after tomorrow. What day of the week is it?
  7. What is wrong with this statement?
  8. What is wrong with this paragraph?
  9. This paragraph is fairly odd. You may look at it and find nothing wrong with it. But if you wish to gain points off this, how about a hint: It’s not what this paragraph has, it’s what it’s missing.
  10. Two people meet up one day and find something peculiar about the amount of money they have. One of them says “If you give me $1500, then we’ll have the same amount of money.” Then the other one says “If you give me $1500, then I’ll have three times as much money as you do.” How much money do they each have??
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Seth Casel

Seth is the author of Rage Inducing Puzzles, Hexudoku, and How To Square Anything. He currently takes math at the Upper School and, as his profile picture suggests, is very good at taking screenshots of virtual creatures. He enjoys reading, math, playing video games, playing chess, and coming up with more rage inducing puzzles!

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About the Author

Seth Casel
Seth is the author of Rage Inducing Puzzles, Hexudoku, and How To Square Anything. He currently takes math at the Upper School and, as his profile picture suggests, is very good at taking screenshots of virtual creatures. He enjoys reading, math, playing video games, playing chess, and coming up with more rage inducing puzzles!
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